Short List of Favorite Works for Clarinet by Women Composers

Clarinet, Clarinet Teachers and Professors, Classical clarinetists-female, Female Composers, Teaching, Uncategorized

What follows are clarinet works by women composers that I enjoy. Where possible I have added dates and country of origin. This list is not meant to be exhaustive in any way. But it is, hopefully, a starting point in your exploration of clarinet music written by women. 

Please! Right now I do not have time to respond to requests for additions. But I do have time to make corrections to anything in this list. Many thanks to my colleagues who assisted, including Mary Alice Druhan, David Niethamer, Georg Kühner, Brian Hill, and Dylan James.

Women Composers with Works for Clarinet

Berg, Stephanie (b. 1986): Three Prayers (2016)
American — Chamber: soprano, clarinet and piano

Brandon, Jenni (b. 1977): Chansons de la Nature pour la Clarinette
American — Unaccompanied

Clark, Rebecca (1886-1979): Duo For Clarinet and Viola    
English — Chamber: duo for clarinet and viola

Cleare, Ann (b. 1983) – eyam i (it takes an ocean not to) (2009-13)
Irish — Unaccompanied
Note: contemporary techniques abound! 

Feigin, Sarah (1928-2011):  Fantasy for Clarinet and Piano
Latvian — Clarinet/piano

Farrenc, Louise (1804–1875): Trio for clarinet, violoncello and piano Es-dur, op.44 (1861)
French — Chamber: trio

Fromm-Michaels, Ilse (1888-1986):  Stimmungen eines Fauns
German — Clarinet/piano

Fujiie, Keiko (b. 1963): Three Pieces
Japan — Unaccompanied

Gipps, Ruth (1921-1999) Concerto for Clarinet and Orchestra, Op. 9 (1940)
English — Concerto

Gipps, Ruth (1921-1999) The Kelpie Of Corrievreckan for Clarinet and Piano, Op. 5b (1939)
English — Clarinet/piano

Gotkovsky, Ida (b. 1933) Solo Clarinet Sonata
French — Unaccompanied

Gotkovsky, Ida (b. 1933) Concerto
French — Clarinet/piano; concerto

Gotkovsky, Ida (b. 1933): Chanson for clarinet and piano
French — Clarinet/piano

Hemenway, Edith (b. 1926): Question of Travel (2007)    
American — Chamber: trio for clarinet, cello and piano    
Note: Hemenway’s clarinet music may be heard on the recording entitled ‘To Paradise for Onions: Songs and Chamber Works of Edith Hemenway’. Nancy Braithwaite, Clarinet. 

Higdon, Jennifer (b. 1962): Clarinet Sonata
American — Clarinet/piano

Higdon, Jennifer (b. 1962): Dash
American — Chamber: trio for clarinet, violin, and piano

Holmès, Augusta Mary Anne (1847 – 1903): Fantasie (1900)
French/Irish — Clarinet/piano

Hoover, Katherine (1937-2018):  Ritual, Op. 41
American — Clarinet/piano

Hoover, Katherine (1937-2018): Set for Clarinet
American — Unaccompanied

Hyde, Miriam (1913-2005): Tangled Rope
Australian — Unaccompanied

Kraemer Schleicher, Caroline (1794-1850): Sonatina for A Clarinet and Piano
German — Clarinet/piano

Larsen, Libby (b. 1950-): Dancing Solo
American — Unaccompanied

Larsen, Libby (b. 1950): Licorice Stick for clarinet and piano (2002)
American — Clarinet/piano

Lim, Liza (b. 1966): Sonorous Body (2008)
Australian — Unaccompanied

Maconchy, Elizabeth Dame (1907-1994): Fantasy for clarinet and piano*
Irish-English — Clarinet/piano

Morishita, Chikako (b. 1981): Lizard for clarinet, trumpet, trombone (2011)
Japan — Chamber: trio

Musgrave, Thea (b. 1928) Threnody for Clarinet and Piano (1997)
Scottish-American — Clarinet/piano

Ran, Shulamit (b. 1949): Three Scenes For Clarinet
Israeli-American — Unaccompanied

Ran, Shulamit (b. 1949): For An Actor: Monologue For Clarinet in A
Israeli-American — Unaccompanied

Rueff, Jeanine (1922-1999): Concertino for clarinet and piano (1950)
French — Clarinet/piano

Saariaho, Kaija (b. 1952):  Duft (8 minutes) (2011)
Finland — Unaccompanied

Shatin, Judith (b. 1949): Meridians (1988)
American — Unaccompanied 

Smith, Mary Alice (also Meadows White)  (1839-1884): Sonata for A Clarinet and Piano
English — Clarinet/piano

Taillefere, Germaine (1892-1983): Sonate (1957)
French — Unaccompanied

Taillefere, Germaine (1892-1983): Arabesque (1973)
French — Clarinet/piano

Tower, Joan (b. 1938): Wings For Solo Clarinet or Bass Clarinet (1981)
American — Unaccompanied

Tower, Joan (b. 1938): Concerto for Clarinet (1988)
American — Concerto

Wasserman, Eva: The Generation of Hope For Clarinet Solo (1994) also arr. Clarinet and Orchestra
Israeli-American — Unaccompanied

Wasserman, Eva: Ode To Odessa for Solo Clarinet (2001) 
Israeli-American — Unaccompanied

Yi, Chen (b. 1953):  Monologue for Solo Clarinet
China — Unaccompanied

 

Teaching Philosophy Statement Is Up On My Website

Clarinet, Classical clarinetists-female, Classical clarinetists-male, Orchestra, Teaching, Uncategorized

‘Done is better than perfect.’ This is my motto for Clarinet Divas, my website and life. Flylady gets the credit for this great motto. This motto especially applies to the writing of a Teaching Philosophy Statement!

It took me a few weeks, but my Teaching Philosophy Statement is now up on my website HERE.

It is also copied and pasted below. Enjoy!

My goal is to discover, nurture, strengthen and encourage the creative talent within each clarinetist while always making artistry the highest objective. My teaching endeavors to guide students towards becoming the best musical version of themselves by developing all aspects of playing — musicianship, tone, technique and performance skills — in order to reach their highest potential, whatever their goals.

My experience as a professional performer, educator, soloist, and chamber musician informs my teaching practice and philosophy.

I employ a pedagogical approach that is rooted in a deep understanding of clarinet fundamentals and musicianship helping students to gain the skills necessary to succeed. Students study standard and contemporary works at their level. Discussion of phrasing and style in the manner of D. Stanley Hasty and Mitchell Lurie is ongoing. Joe Allard’s attention to releasing excess tension was the foundation for my study of the body. Because tightness can affect the ease of performance, I address tension issues and quickly find solutions. Students receive a thorough foundation for becoming outstanding clarinetists and exceptional musicians. This includes learning how to read pop and jazz charts, working on opera music, preparing for any type of audition, and reviewing strategies for starting teaching studios in urban centers.

When recruiting, I look for students who not only are superb musicians with keen rhythm, excellent tonguing and facile technique, but those who are patient with themselves, creative, kind, eager and engaged in the process of learning.

In addition, my studio is:

Results-oriented

The ultimate objective is to prepare students musically and technically for future aspirations, whatever they may be. Mastery of the clarinet will be accomplished by the study of etudes, methods, excerpts and repertoire, appropriate for each level.

Customized

Lessons are adapted to the individual’s needs and abilities. I am not interested in clarinet clones, but rather am passionate about guiding students to be the best versions of themselves as musicians. In short, I will strive to help students find their own unique ‘clarinet voice’.

Supportive in problem-solving

Issues and challenges of playing will be identified and solutions introduced in music being studied. If necessary, exercises specific to the problem will be given.

Thorough in studying best practice techniques

Intelligent practice is an art that must be learned in order to excel. In high school and college I largely sight-read music because no one showed me how to practice. My effective practice strategies only came about by playing weekly orchestra concerts, where large amounts of music must be learned quickly and thoroughly. This was trial by fire and nerve-wracking. Therefore strategies I have learned for efficient, intelligent practice will be shared in lessons. Based on years of teaching and performing, these methods are effective.

In closing:

The real challenge of the clarinet is as much about creativity, good phrasing, color in the sound and style as it is about brilliant technique. I believe that performing is not about our egos or how many notes we can play; it is truly about singing through the clarinet, serving the composer, and connecting with our audience.